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Author Topic: Beer Glue
John_Curran
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Hopefully someone will come along with a definitive answer. I would imagine the alcohol content (unless it is all cooked away?) would act as a preservative, and the glue would keep indefinitely.
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Andreas
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What is "a very long time?" Are we talking weeks, months or years?
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George
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quote:
Originally posted by deiridh:
how long will this beer glue keep, and how does one store it?

Beer glue keeps for a very long time and it can be stored in a tightly closed jar in a cool place away from direct light.

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George O'Hanlon
Executive Director
Iconofile, Inc.
A nonprofit educational organization about sacred art

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deiridh
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how long will this beer glue keep, and how does one store it?
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Nancy
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quote:
Originally posted by ce/the olde crow:
Is the beer glue used to MAKE gold assiste, or is it used (diluted) to paint on and apply gold leaf in small lines, or is it used in addition to the shell gold?

Beer glue is not used with shell gold. "Gold assiste" is the phrase that describes thin gold lines applied to an icon; it is not a mixture of beer glue and gold.

Beer glue is an adhesive onto which gold leaf can be applied, just as gold leaf can be applied to bole, which also has adhesive qualities. Because beer glue can be painted in thin lines more easily than bole, it is a good glue for thin gold lines made using regular gold leaf, which gives a more traditional shiny gold line. Shell gold produces a satiny line, not as bright or shiny. Both types of gold have value in iconography.

GILDING WITH BEER GLUE
When an icon is ready for linear gold work, fine pumice powder is applied with a cotton ball to the entire icon, dusting it lightly. This helps prevent gold from sticking to the tempera. Then beer glue is brushed on carefully so that a slightly raised line appears. This line should not be so thick that an indentation forms down the center of the line as the beer dries. The line should be slightly domed.

Since beer glue remains workable for quite a long time, it is possible to apply patent leaf or loose leaf many days after the beer glue has been applied. So there is no need to rush or meet an immediately time deadline.

Gold can be applied to beer glue almost immediately by a skilled gilder, but I recommend that my students apply the glue early in the day and gild several hours later in the last part of class. If we are busy with something else and don't get the gilding done, we simply do it the next time they come, perhaps a couple of days or a week later. Just leave the pumice powder on the icon until gilding is complete.

If gilding right away, the gold will stick easily to the beer glue. If we wait to gild for several days, then we very likely will need to breathe deeply on the icon to create slight moisture on the beer, which increases the tackiness of the glue. Then the leaf is laid easily. We use care not to press too hard on the beer glue lines to avoid flattening them.

Sometimes, we use a technique that creates a more granular look to the gold line. Here is how that is done:
1. Dampen the lips with the tongue.
2. Wipe the index or middle finger across the dampness on the lip.
3. Press the finger to the gold and carry the gold that is picked up to the panel.
4. Tapping repeatedly and lightly, apply the gold to the line of beer glue remembering not to flatten the line with excessive pressure.

Credit for these techniques goes to my mentor, Xenia Pokrovskaya.

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Nancy Jackson
Timshel Studio
Vallejo, CA
(Northeast tip of San Francisco Bay)
www.timshelstudio.com

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ce/the olde crow
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Is the beer glue used to MAKE gold assiste, or is it used (diluted) to paint on and apply gold leaf in small lines, or is it used in addition to the shell gold?

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Soli Deo Gloria!
Ora pro me.
ce/the olde crow
All that is seen is NOT all that is important!
Life, if it ain't funny, it ain't nuthin'.

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George
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quote:
Originally posted by hairysticksnpigments:
I was wondering if anyone knew if honey would work? I mean, when you heat up the beer in that method, you are essentially creating beer-honey, right?

Honey does not work in the same way as beer glue. Besides, beer glue and honey are very different substances--honey does not make an effective adhesive. Honey remains highly hygroscopic (meaning it readily takes up and retains moisture). Honey is sometimes used in gilding recipes as a plasticizer, but it is never used alone in gilding.

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George O'Hanlon
Executive Director
Iconofile, Inc.
A nonprofit educational organization about sacred art

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hairysticksnpigments
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I was wondering if anyone knew if honey would work? I mean, when you heat up the beer in that method, you are essentially creating beer-honey, right?
I may be totally off, but please remember that I am new to the egg-tempera/using non synthetic technique.
Thanks!

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George
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quote:
Originally posted by Nancy:
Thanks for posting this recipe, Nancy. Beer glue is an excellent adhesive for use in painting assist.



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George O'Hanlon
Executive Director
Iconofile, Inc.
A nonprofit educational organization about sacred art

Posts: 911 | From: Northern California | Registered: May 2002  |  IP: Logged
Nancy
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I recently received an inquiry from Dick Sinclair regarding my method for applying gold in thin lines (aka "gold assist") by the ancient Russian method using beer glue for the adhesive. Below is the method shown me by Xenia Pokrovskaya, my mentor:

Beer Glue

The best glue is made from light beer. One liter of beer will make a couple of tablespoons of glue.

Stovetop Method: Pour beer in a wide uncovered shallow container or double boiler and bring water beneath the beer to a very warm temp, stirring often to keep the surface free of a crust. Reduce the beer to a honey-like consistency. This should take 4-8 hours. Test for tackiness by rubbing between fingers, pressing fingers together to determine stickiness.

Oven Method: Warm beer in a wide uncovered shallow container in an oven until reduced to a honey-like consistency. Test for tackiness by rubbing between fingers, pressing fingers together to determine stickiness.

I hope this answers your question, Dick.

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Nancy Jackson
Timshel Studio
Vallejo, CA
(Northeast tip of San Francisco Bay)
www.timshelstudio.com

Posts: 56 | From: San Francisco Bay Area | Registered: May 2002  |  IP: Logged


 
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