Iconofile: Icons and Sacred Art
Iconofile: Icons and Sacred Art Iconofile: Icons and Sacred Art
   
 
Iconofile Forum


Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply
my profile | directory login | | search | faq | forum home
  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» Iconofile Forum   » Techniques & Materials   » Painting white garments (Page 2)

 - Send-to-a-Friend: Email this page to someone!  
This topic comprises 2 pages: 1  2 
 
Author Topic: Painting white garments
Jill
Member
Member # 355

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Jill     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by daniel:
Thank you; I was taught that some part of the image should "escape" the border, that this symbolized grace entering the world. Usually that is just the halo, going over the border at the top

While it is permissible to allow the halo to extend beyond the lower edge of the upper border of an icon, the whole composition still remains circumscribed by the border - the halo should not extend beyond this. There is no "should" requirement for the halo to extend beyond the inner bounds of the border, in fact, it is overwhelmingly the case that all elements of an icon's composition are contained within the full border.

On the other hand, there exist only a tiny number of historical icons which show other parts of the composition extending beyond the inner edges of the border, mainly ones of St George the Great-martyr on horseback. In such icons, the extension over the border is kept quite subtle.

quote:
but I like it when the person himself is not limited to the embordered area
If the reasoning behind the extension of the halo into the border area is symbolic of grace entering the world, then it suffices that the halo itself, as the definitive motif of the saint's sanctity and deification, is so extended. Saints, though sanctified and spiritually perfected, nevertheless, are still circumscribed human beings, and do not "fill the universe at all points" - this is solely the prerogative of God.
Posts: 182 | Registered: Sep 2005  |  IP: Logged
daniel
Member
Member # 190

Icon 1 posted      Profile for daniel   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Thank you; I was taught that some part of the image should "escape" the border, that this symbolized grace entering the world. Usually that is just the halo, going over the border at the top, but I like it when the person himself is not limited to the embordered area...

--------------------
daniel

Posts: 200 | From: ohio | Registered: Jul 2003  |  IP: Logged
John_Curran
Member
Member # 5464

Icon 1 posted      Profile for John_Curran     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Very nice, Daniel. I will study that example, and I think St. Seraphim is also very well done in white. Thanks!

John

PS I really enjoy how the image of St.Seraphim 'escapes' the border in several places.

Posts: 66 | From: USA | Registered: Dec 2008  |  IP: Logged
daniel
Member
Member # 190

Icon 1 posted      Profile for daniel   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
John- The St Nicholas icon on my website has bishop's robes. I started with nimbus grey, and highlighted as I said earlier, if you want to look at it.

--------------------
daniel

Posts: 200 | From: ohio | Registered: Jul 2003  |  IP: Logged
John_Curran
Member
Member # 5464

Icon 1 posted      Profile for John_Curran     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Thank you, Tom, you've been very helpful.
Posts: 66 | From: USA | Registered: Dec 2008  |  IP: Logged
Tom
Member
Member # 16

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Tom     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I also use Jo Sonja and you could start with a all over mid-tone like Smoked Pearl or something darker, add your dark lines and float dark areas in the recesses and then finally your bright whites for highlights. I use Dick Blick Block Out white for the finals as it is opaque and I am a one stroke kind of guy.

I looked at several icons I have downloaded and the range for "white" is blue to grey. In some of the books, white is reserved only for ozivki and thats why it sometimes is represented by blues.

I highly reccommend the books I found in Greece if you know someone or somebody going there. The shipping is outrageous but the books are amazing. Unfortunately, they are in Greek and translation is hard for American Greeks because they don't understand the context but the pictures are truely worth a thousand words.

http://www.e-morfi.gr/home.php?cat=89

here is the link and good luck trying to figure out the order form. I did it and they came in 2 days! They are very pricey and the shipping is as much as one book. But so worth it.

--------------------
Tom

Posts: 428 | From: Omaha, NE | Registered: May 2002  |  IP: Logged
John_Curran
Member
Member # 5464

Icon 1 posted      Profile for John_Curran     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Thank you Tom and Daniel for your replies.

Yes, I am using Jo Sonja acrylics, and will try your suggestions, Daniel.

The problem is, the white garment is a bishop's stole (Omophorion) which lays very flat on the shoulders, giving little opportunity to paint folds and creases.

It may even be one of the exceptions where a nearly pure white snowy 'mantle' is called for, [but I'm not looking to take an easy way out.]

The subject is St. Patrick, although the question is of gemeral interest to me.

Thanks again,

John

Posts: 66 | From: USA | Registered: Dec 2008  |  IP: Logged
daniel
Member
Member # 190

Icon 1 posted      Profile for daniel   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
As you are learning from Pearson's book, I assume you are using Jo Sonja acrylics, which he recommends, and which I use.
To make white garments begin with a grey; this can either be nimbus grey, straight from the tube, or a mixture of (a very little) payne's grey with lots of titanium white, for a pale periwinkle-ish grey, or yellow oxide with white and a little nimbus for a more golden hue. Then begin highlighting with unbleached titanium, then pure titanium white. This requires a lot of thin coats to build up the highlight.
Hope that helps...

--------------------
daniel

Posts: 200 | From: ohio | Registered: Jul 2003  |  IP: Logged
Tom
Member
Member # 16

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Tom     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I can't speak for others but this is tough for me.

What are you painting in? Tempera or acrylic?

--------------------
Tom

Posts: 428 | From: Omaha, NE | Registered: May 2002  |  IP: Logged
John_Curran
Member
Member # 5464

Icon 1 posted      Profile for John_Curran     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Would someone be willing to give me some idea how to proceed with painting a garment which should 'read' as white when finished? Thank you for any help you may be able to give me, John
Posts: 66 | From: USA | Registered: Dec 2008  |  IP: Logged



This topic comprises 2 pages: 1  2 
 
Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply Close Topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:

© 2003-2015 Iconofile. All rights to the postings in this forum become that of Iconofile.

Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classicTM 6.5.0