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John
Member # 183
 - posted
I once stumbled across a site that summarized a study in which the author stated that there were about twenty some odd pigments most frequently used in the historical Russian icon palette, but the article's abstract did not list them.

Does anyone know what pigments were/are most frequently used in the Russian palette? I know that there are regional (perhaps also period) variances based on availability, but this article indicated that there is a "typical" or "average" palette that was/is used. Also, any idea what the palette was during the "height" of Russian icon painting during the 14th to 16th centuries, especially in the Moscow and Novgorod Schools?

I did see an article on the Natural Pigments website that listed almost 20 pigments, but for some reason, I think the author of the article I mentioned previously stated that there were about 27.

Thanks for any help as I continue to create my palette of pigments.
 
George
Member # 1
 - posted
John,

There are no specific numbers of pigments in the Russian icon painting palette, because they have changed with time. The article on the Natural Pigments, Color in Old Russian Painting: Symbolism and technique of painting in medieval Rus may list a number of pigments, but there were undoubtedly more in use during the medieval period in Russia. The ones listed are the most often encountered on Russian medieval painting.
 




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